4 Ways To Style A Tweed Jacket

Tweed jackets are a timeless classic. Available in lots of different patterns, colours and cuts, there are almost limitless types of tweed jackets. But just because you have the jacket doesn’t mean you have the look sorted. So here are just a few tips on how to make sure you get the tweed look down to a fine art.

The Smart/Casual Look         

To start, something simple and elegant. A tweed jacket is a nice alternative to a standard blazer. It’s a useful tool in any smart looking gent’s wardrobe, as it provides a brilliant way of simply lifting any outfit from just casual to smart/casual. Generally this look will use a shirt, jumper, smart trousers and some kind of neckwear. Whether it be a tie, a cravat or a scarf these also contribute to making the outfit much sharper.

  

The Country Gentleman  

The classic look that one might associate with the British countryside. This look is a must if you’re planning on going grouse hunting, or clay pigeon shooting.  Often paired with a pair of wellington boots and a wax jacket, the tweed jacket can be worn with a windowpane checked shirt, a simple tie and cotton trousers of a similar colour profile. To top the look off, pop on a flat cap and you’re ready for a day in the country side.

The Working Class Hero

This style is probably more famous as the ‘Peaky Blinders’ look that the Shelby brothers have worn over the last few years on our TV screens. Although it was more prevalent in the 1920s this look appeared in the working classes well into the 30s and 40s due to the great depression and the beginning of the Second World War.

To achieve this look use a dark grey tweed jacket. Ideally a charcoal 3 piece suit would be best. However grey tweed jackets with a set of wool black/charcoal waistcoat and trousers, a starched club collar shirt and a nice simple tie. To finish this off use wear a blue newsboy cap and a pair of shined black boots with a cap toe.

The Vintage Golfer

Perhaps one of the most distinct of the looks, the golfer’s style incorporates the lots of different elements in to one recognisable outfit. Typically worn by the upper classes, the tweed jacket is worn over a thick jumper, shirt and tie. The tweed jacket is then matched with a pair of trousers wrapped tightly from the foot with First World War style putties, to keep the elements out.

If you would like to make the outfit a bit different, you could also wear the combination with a kilt and Argyle socks. If you would like to reflect the origins of the sport this would be perfect! Finally again pair this look with the appropriate headwear. Either a flat cap or a tam o’ shanter would fit the bill well.     

So there you have it, tweed jackets can be more than just a dull way of keeping warm. In fact I’d go as far to say that tweed jackets can be the most important part of any man’s wardrobe if used correctly, so next time you’re looking for something to wear think about that old tweed jacket in the wardrobe.